Dr. Michael Talbot, University of St. Andrews
British diplomacy in the Ottoman Empire during the long eighteenth century

Key Points
This research has mainly focused on the links between commerce, finance, and culture in the early modern Ottoman Empire. Using the case study of the British embassy in Istanbul in a “long” eighteenth century (1660-1807) to demonstrate the intimate links between mercantile interests, provision of finance, cultural convention, and diplomatic practice. Having consulted a large range of material in the British and Ottoman archives, from a wide variety of archival and printed documents and financial records in English, Italian, and Ottoman Turkish, and incorporating a number of material sources, including paintings, maps, and museum artifacts (timepieces, textiles, etc).

Some suggested reading: Maurits van den Boogert, The Capitulations at the Ottoman Legal System: Qadis, Consuls and Beratlıs in the Eighteenth Century (2005); A. Nuri Yurdusev (ed.), Ottoman Diplomacy: Conventional or Unconventional? (2004); Daniel Goffman, The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe (2002); John Watkins, ‘Toward a new diplomatic history of medieval and early modern Europe’, Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 38:1 (2008), 1-14.

Arts & Humanities, History |

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